Tag Archives: actor skills

Food For Thought

Two things to keep in mind:

1) Most audiences cannot distinguish between poor dialect work and a poor performance. They just sense that something is ‘wonky’ and irritating and they cease to be properly engaged in the story.

2) No other skill on an actor’s resume (not singing, dancing, bareback riding, or martial arts) is so intimately entwined with an actor’s process as is dialect work. Any dialect you use for a performance will always be inextricably linked to every action you play, every intention you pursue. If you want the freedom to do your best acting work, you must have the target dialect ready to integrate* at a project’s first read through.

* You’ll know you are ready to integrate a dialect when you’ve mastered it to the point of being able to extemporize while remaining accurate and consistent.

Serious, Serious, Serious! (And Now For Something Completely Different)

I’ve been serious, serious, serious thus far in blog-land.

When it comes to voice, speech and dialect work, serious can be good, but to get the very best results, you’ve got to be sure to fuel your sense of play, too…so…

Time for some fun!

Here are a few of my favorite voice and speech related clips for your enjoyment— a bit of tricky dialogue, some ultra-specific mimicry, some Shakespeare and an unusual demonstration of the potential of the human voice…

First up, a simple sketch from The Tonight Show back when Johnny Carson was king…

Next VO actor Josh Robert Thompson demonstrates the fine art of voice matching. (Voice matching is essentially dialect work taken to the next level…)

Here Actor Brian Cox teaches a bit of Shakespeare to the world’s smallest Hamlet.

And finally…Tuvan Throat Singing (Overtone Singing) meets John Newton’s Amazing Grace. There are no tricks or devices here. This man is making this sound with his voice and nothing else.

Have you got favorite voice, speech and dialect clips?

Post them in the comment section!

Accent Reduction

If you live in Los Angeles (or nearly any major metropolitan area) you’ve seen the handmade signs stapled to telephone poles that say ‘Lose Your Accent!’ or ‘Accent Reduction!’ followed by a phone number where you can purchase lessons.

But guess what?

There is no such thing as ‘Accent Reduction.’

Learning to speak in an accent other than the one you arrived at naturally is an acquired skill. It is something that is added to your list of abilities, not something that erases an ability you already possess.

Think of it this way—when you were a little kid, and you learned how to skip or to jump, did you give up walking? Did the skipping or jumping ‘erase’ your ability to walk? Of course not. You walked when it made sense to walk, and skipped or jumped for enjoyment or to get over an obstacle. To this day you still know how to walk, skip, and jump and you use each of them as they seem most appropriate.

Even if it were magically possible that learning a new accent could ‘erase’ the one you naturally have, as an actor why on Earth would you want to do that? It would only make you eligible for fewer roles.

For the record, the appropriate term for learning a new accent is ‘Accent Acquisition.’

That said, please forgive your agent, manager, or acting coach if they toss around the term ‘Accent Reduction.’ They’ve probably just read a whole lot of telephone poles…

Insider Info

If your actor resume includes a section that looks pretty much like this…

DIALECTS – English (RP), Cockney, German, French, American Southern, New York

…any savvy casting director will suspect that you have listed the dialects you were introduced to during an actor training program, and are most likely proficient in none of them.

(They also tend to suspect that you are over-estimating your other abilities…)